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    Patricia Rossi is America’s etiquette and protocol coach, with over 20 years experience in business etiquette and protocol training.

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"Unbought and Unbossed" – The Story of Shirley Chisholm

“When morality comes up against profit, it is seldom that profit loses.” – Shirley Chisholm (1924-2005), the first black woman elected to the U.S. Congress.

She hired only women in her congressional office, 50% were white. She once said, “Tremendous amounts of talent are lost to our society just because that talent wea…rs a skirt.” In 1972, she became the first women to run for the Democratic presidential nomination against George McGovern. She had a diverse base, but knew she would most likely lose. She didn’t do it to win the presidential election. “Chisholm said she ran for the office “in spite of hopeless odds… to demonstrate the sheer will and refusal to accept the status quo.”‘

She wrote two books, “Unbought and Unbossed” and “The Good Fight.” She once said that being a women put more obstacles in her way than being black and in a Peabody Award winning documentary, Chisholm ’72 – Unbought & Unbossed chronicling her race for the White House she says, “When I die, I want to be remembered as a woman who lived in the twentieth century and who dared to be a catalyst for change. I don’t want be remembered as the first black women who went to congress, and I don’t even want to be remembered as the first women who happen to be black to make a bid for the presidency. I want to be remembered as a women who fought for change in the twentieth century. That’s what I want.”

I remember her. I wish I could have voted for her.

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“Unbought and Unbossed” – The Story of Shirley Chisholm

“When morality comes up against profit, it is seldom that profit loses.” – Shirley Chisholm (1924-2005), the first black woman elected to the U.S. Congress.

She hired only women in her congressional office, 50% were white. She once said, “Tremendous amounts of talent are lost to our society just because that talent wea…rs a skirt.” In 1972, she became the first women to run for the Democratic presidential nomination against George McGovern. She had a diverse base, but knew she would most likely lose. She didn’t do it to win the presidential election. “Chisholm said she ran for the office “in spite of hopeless odds… to demonstrate the sheer will and refusal to accept the status quo.”‘

She wrote two books, “Unbought and Unbossed” and “The Good Fight.” She once said that being a women put more obstacles in her way than being black and in a Peabody Award winning documentary, Chisholm ’72 – Unbought & Unbossed chronicling her race for the White House she says, “When I die, I want to be remembered as a woman who lived in the twentieth century and who dared to be a catalyst for change. I don’t want be remembered as the first black women who went to congress, and I don’t even want to be remembered as the first women who happen to be black to make a bid for the presidency. I want to be remembered as a women who fought for change in the twentieth century. That’s what I want.”

I remember her. I wish I could have voted for her.

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Sometimes, it doesn't take a village,… it just takes one person

“By nature she was a conceiver, a trail-blazer, a pilgrim of life’s wholeness. So day by day, month after month, year in and year out, she labored to provide me with a diction and a voice sufficient for my service to the blind.” —Helen Keller, writing about Anne Sullivan (1866-1936)

Anne Sullivan lost her mother at 7, her beloved brother at 10 and her father simply deserted them sending Anne and her brother to a home. She was blind from a bacteria that went untreated. She begged to attend the school for the blind, to be educated.

At the age of 29, “Michael Anagnos, Director of the Perkins School for the Blind, asked his star pupil, Anne, if she was interested in working for the Keller family in Tuscumbia, Alabama. He told her that their six-year-old daughter, Helen Keller
, had been deaf and blind since the age of 19 months because of a severe illness.Since that time the baby had grown into a wild and increasingly uncontrollable child. The parents, Kate and Arthur Keller, had contacted the famous inventor and educator of the deaf, Alexander Graham Bell in Washington, D.C. for help. He, in turn, had put them in touch with the Perkins School for the Blind.” And the rest, of course is history. Anne Sullivan, though born in poverty, and lost her family at 10, she persevered and touched more lives than she every could have expected. She gave Helen a world to see.

source: American Foundation for the Blind

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Sometimes, it doesn’t take a village,… it just takes one person

“By nature she was a conceiver, a trail-blazer, a pilgrim of life’s wholeness. So day by day, month after month, year in and year out, she labored to provide me with a diction and a voice sufficient for my service to the blind.” —Helen Keller, writing about Anne Sullivan (1866-1936)

Anne Sullivan lost her mother at 7, her beloved brother at 10 and her father simply deserted them sending Anne and her brother to a home. She was blind from a bacteria that went untreated. She begged to attend the school for the blind, to be educated.

At the age of 29, “Michael Anagnos, Director of the Perkins School for the Blind, asked his star pupil, Anne, if she was interested in working for the Keller family in Tuscumbia, Alabama. He told her that their six-year-old daughter, Helen Keller
, had been deaf and blind since the age of 19 months because of a severe illness.Since that time the baby had grown into a wild and increasingly uncontrollable child. The parents, Kate and Arthur Keller, had contacted the famous inventor and educator of the deaf, Alexander Graham Bell in Washington, D.C. for help. He, in turn, had put them in touch with the Perkins School for the Blind.” And the rest, of course is history. Anne Sullivan, though born in poverty, and lost her family at 10, she persevered and touched more lives than she every could have expected. She gave Helen a world to see.

source: American Foundation for the Blind

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15 Minutes of Fame in 15 Months

Not that I spend time watching, but did you know the Tour de France does not allow women to participate because it is believed that they do not have the endurance that men do?! Some day.

In the meantime, there is a wonderful story about the FIRST woman to bike around the world – in 1894! Annie Cohen Kopchovsky claims, she played loosely with the truth (why let the details ruin a good story)

Annie Londonderry

, that she made a wager of $5000 that she would bike around the world in 15 months. “Despite having never ridden a bicycle, she pedalled out of Boston leaving her husband and young children .” Always the entrepreneur, Annie made a deal with the Londonderry Lithia Spring Water Company to carry a banner for just $100 – around the world! That is some cheap and effective advertising AND Annie took on the name and was referred to as Annie Londonderry
. Apparently, she turned her “bicycle and body into a billboard, carrying advertising banners and ribbons through cities around the world.”

She traveled light – a change of close and a pearl-handled revolver (too bad product placement didn’t come around for 100 years). ”

After the trip, Londonderry moved her family to New York, where under the by-line ‘The New Woman,’ she wrote sensational features for several months for the New York World. Her first story was an account of her cycling adventure. ‘I am a journalist and ’a new woman,’ she wrote, ”if that term means that I believe I can do anything that any man can do.” Her 15 minutes ended and in 1947 she died few people knowing about her feat. source: Wikipedia

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Women in the Board Room

Why do people always refer to Norway as “progressive?”  I would almost call them “backward” or “impulsive.  ”

In 2006, the Norwegian government imposed a law that would require “State-owned companies are already obliged to comply and now have 45% female representation on their boards.”  Since 2003, it was voluntary, but nothing happened.

The Norwegian equality minister, Karita Bekkemellem, is now threatening firms that don’t comply with closure.

“From January 1 2006, I want to put in place a system of sanctions that will allow the closure of firms,” she said. “I do not want to wait another 20 or 30 years for men with enough intelligence to finally appoint women. More than half of the people who have a business education today are women. It is wrong for companies not to use them. They should be represented.”

Did it work? Well, no.

A study by Amy Dittmar, associate professor of finance at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business and her colleague Kenneth Ahern “found that when a board had a 10% increase in the number of women, the value of the company dropped. The bigger the change to the structure of the board, the bigger the fall in returns.”

“The constraint imposed by the 40-percent women quota-led firms to recruit women board members that were younger and had different career experiences than the existing directors,” says Dittmar.

What’s the answer?  Forced compliance?  Does it really matter?  The majority of small business owners are women.  We end up making our own board and supplying the products that women want.  Perhaps the answer is simply making our own way instead of waiting for someone to make it for us.

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Smoking: Breaking Down Marriages and Sullying Reputations

I’ve always felt that anti-smoking advocates either were effective marketers, or terrific lobbyists.  It is amazing to me how smoking has gone from accepted 20 years ago to contemptible today.  Consider the recent news from the Gaza Strip where, according to the Associated Press, plain clothes Hamas security officers served restaurant owners with a ban, taking women’s ability to smoke water pipes in cafes away.

WHEN WILL IT STOP!  Now what do women have in the middle east that they can enjoy?  I’ll bet the water pipe was the final freedom.  The reason for the ban is that it, “destroys marriages and sullies the image of the Palestinian people.”

It is so horrible that they are only going to allow men to smoke the water pipes not the women.  It’s just too awful.

“While Muslim law does not technically ban women from smoking the traditional tobacco-infused pipes, tradition frowns upon the habit. Hamas frequently mixes its strict interpretation of Islamic law with conservative Gaza tradition, and over the weekend, the two dovetailed to produce the smoking ban.”

“”It is inappropriate for a woman to sit cross-legged and smoke in public. It harms the image of our people,” Ihab Ghussein, Hamas interior ministry spokesman, said in a statement released Sunday.”

WHAT IF THEY SIT WITH CROSSED KNEES?  HOW ABOUT NO CROSSINGS AT ALL.

“Many women who smoke in public were divorced when their husbands saw them, or found out about them,” said Hamas police spokesman, Ayman Batneiji, without substantiating his claim.

Source: AP

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