• Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 61 other followers

  • Archives

  • Listen to internet radio with Women On The Move on Blog Talk Radio Join us every Wednesday evening at 7pm eastern time for the Round Table of Five Women with Distinct Views Discussing Current Events - Sparks Will Fly!
  • Great Prices.  Brand Names.
  • Focus on Today’s Woman

    Patricia Rossi is America’s etiquette and protocol coach, with over 20 years experience in business etiquette and protocol training.

    Think you are a polished professional? Test your etiquette knowledge and learn how your actions may be sending the right or wrong signals. Patricia Rossi’s “Manners Minute” TV segments air weekly on NBC, CBS, FOX, ABC and other affiliates throughout the U.S. Patricia is a sought after etiquette coach, consultant, public speaker, columnist, television and radio personality. Her focus is on kindness as opposed to formality, Relationship...not rules. Her seminars on social and professional protocol are engaging and shed new light on modern manners from business leaders, professional athletes, children and young adults in real life situations. Learn more at PatriciaRossi.com. If you live in the Tampa area, check out her classes.
  • Recent Comments

    Pearl on FROM THE VAULT 1984: Mississip…
    Johnnyot on FROM THE VAULT: April 19, 1967…
    Olen on FROM THE VAULT 1984: Mississip…

She was dumped like trash in the outdoor prison yard

Take a good look at Marcia Powell’s face; look at her eyes. She never knew her mother or father and at the age of 14 ran away from her adoptive home and spent the next 43 years on the streets, in and out of jail, on drugs and surviving (if you call it that) by prostituting herself. She was diagnosed as mentally ill and they “tried” drugs on her.

On May 19th of last year, she reportedly told the prison psychologist that she felt suicidal. She was dumped like trash in the outdoor prison yard, surrounded by a chain link fence referred to by prisoners as a “cage”, without shade and allegedly refused water for four hours in 107 degree heat awaiting transportation to the psychiatric unit. Her difficult life ended there alone. Her core body temperature at death was 108 degrees, she had second and third degree burns on her body and blistering on her skin.

On Wednesday, the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office announced it would not to prosecute anyone for her death. – Remembering Marcia Powell

Share

“Let’s hope that the key conferences aren’t when she’s menstruating or something” – G. Gordon Liddy on Supreme Court Justice nominee Sonia Sotmayor

You spend your entire life scraping and scratching for every opportunity, a difficult task after your father suddenly dies when you are just nine years old and your mother is tasked with being the sole bread winner. You’re raised around junkies and gangs, but you focus on making yourself better, education is your key to getting out from under the poverty and challenges your family has endured, stay the course and focus on being your best. You earn a spot and scholarship to a college prep school, but the hard work is just beginning. In order to attend college, you can’t just be good, you have to be exceptional, because, in order to attend, you need a scholarship.

Your hard work is rewarded when you are designated valedictorian of your class and you enter Princeton on a full scholarship, followed by Yale Law School. Then many years later, you are nominated as a U.S. Supreme Court Judge, the highest court in the land. Your father would have been so proud. Your hard work has paid off. The nation is watching you, they are talking about your accomplishments. Lots of people are talking. All the sacrifices and the heartaches have brought you to this very point and then you hear:

“Let’s hope that the key conferences aren’t when she’s menstruating or something.”

Sotomayor is not the only accomplished woman that has been the subject of a sexist sound bite. On August 31st, the Women’s Campaign Forum, the Women’s Media Center and Political Parity launched “Name It, Change It,” a media campaign focused on putting the spotlight on sexism in the media. For years, women have politely ignored the host of comments about PMS, driving, blondes, butts and breasts and the GIRLFRIENDS are getting together and Naming Names!  We are getting down in the dirt; we’re going to spar on the mat of ignorance and come out the victor.  WE ARE NAMING NAMES and focusing the BIG BOLD LASER OF SHAME on the culprits.

The best part is, WE now have a Website.  That means we are organized!  And, we are organized on Facebook and Twitter AND we have a place to REPORT IT.

So get out there, become a fan of “Name It. Change It,” and join the cause.  Once we NAME IT, Change is inevitable.

I’ll get you started.  Here’s my list of sexist comments in the media:

“The reason she’s a U.S. senator, the reason she’s a candidate for president, the reason she may be a front-runner is her husband messed around. That’s how she got to be senator from New York. We keep forgetting it.  She didn’t win there on her merit.” – Chris Matthews on Hillary Clinton during the Presidential primaries in 2008.

“There’s also this issue that, on April 18, she gave birth to a baby with Down syndrome… The baby is just slightly more than 4 months old now. Children with Down syndrome require an awful lot of attention. The role of vice president, it seems to me, would take up an awful lot of her time, and it raises the issue of how much time will she have to dedicate to her newborn child?” – John Roberts on Sarah Palin’s VP nomination (on national television).

“If we get rid of the moon, women, whose menstrual cycles are governed by the moon, will not get PMS. They will stop bitching and whining.”GOVERNOR Arnold Schwarzenegger to Howard Stern during his radio show.

“Without ‘Fascistic Hatred, Malkin Is Just a ‘Mashed-Up Bag of Meat with Lipstick.” Keith Olbermann on Michele Malkin.

Share

"Let's hope that the key conferences aren't when she's menstruating or something" – G. Gordon Liddy on Supreme Court Justice nominee Sonia Sotmayor

You spend your entire life scraping and scratching for every opportunity, a difficult task after your father suddenly dies when you are just nine years old and your mother is tasked with being the sole bread winner. You’re raised around junkies and gangs, but you focus on making yourself better, education is your key to getting out from under the poverty and challenges your family has endured, stay the course and focus on being your best. You earn a spot and scholarship to a college prep school, but the hard work is just beginning. In order to attend college, you can’t just be good, you have to be exceptional, because, in order to attend, you need a scholarship.

Your hard work is rewarded when you are designated valedictorian of your class and you enter Princeton on a full scholarship, followed by Yale Law School. Then many years later, you are nominated as a U.S. Supreme Court Judge, the highest court in the land. Your father would have been so proud. Your hard work has paid off. The nation is watching you, they are talking about your accomplishments. Lots of people are talking. All the sacrifices and the heartaches have brought you to this very point and then you hear:

“Let’s hope that the key conferences aren’t when she’s menstruating or something.”

Sotomayor is not the only accomplished woman that has been the subject of a sexist sound bite. On August 31st, the Women’s Campaign Forum, the Women’s Media Center and Political Parity launched “Name It, Change It,” a media campaign focused on putting the spotlight on sexism in the media. For years, women have politely ignored the host of comments about PMS, driving, blondes, butts and breasts and the GIRLFRIENDS are getting together and Naming Names!  We are getting down in the dirt; we’re going to spar on the mat of ignorance and come out the victor.  WE ARE NAMING NAMES and focusing the BIG BOLD LASER OF SHAME on the culprits.

The best part is, WE now have a Website.  That means we are organized!  And, we are organized on Facebook and Twitter AND we have a place to REPORT IT.

So get out there, become a fan of “Name It. Change It,” and join the cause.  Once we NAME IT, Change is inevitable.

I’ll get you started.  Here’s my list of sexist comments in the media:

“The reason she’s a U.S. senator, the reason she’s a candidate for president, the reason she may be a front-runner is her husband messed around. That’s how she got to be senator from New York. We keep forgetting it.  She didn’t win there on her merit.” – Chris Matthews on Hillary Clinton during the Presidential primaries in 2008.

“There’s also this issue that, on April 18, she gave birth to a baby with Down syndrome… The baby is just slightly more than 4 months old now. Children with Down syndrome require an awful lot of attention. The role of vice president, it seems to me, would take up an awful lot of her time, and it raises the issue of how much time will she have to dedicate to her newborn child?” – John Roberts on Sarah Palin’s VP nomination (on national television).

“If we get rid of the moon, women, whose menstrual cycles are governed by the moon, will not get PMS. They will stop bitching and whining.”GOVERNOR Arnold Schwarzenegger to Howard Stern during his radio show.

“Without ‘Fascistic Hatred, Malkin Is Just a ‘Mashed-Up Bag of Meat with Lipstick.” Keith Olbermann on Michele Malkin.

Share

MOM ALERT: DAUGHTERS LACK ROLE MODELS

My daughter’s sixth grade class participates in an annual tradition in her school called “The Wax Museum.”  The children choose a person/character they would like to represent, and then dress up during a special day in which the entire school participates.  My daughter’s first choice was Massie, the Queen Bee of a prep school in the Clique book series by Lisi Harrison.  Then she decided perhaps Dawn Wells, Mary Anne from Gilligan’s Island was a better choice until she Googled her and learned about her reckless driving arrest, et al.

“What about Sandra Day O’Connor, first woman on the U.S. Supreme Court?” I asked.

“No.”

“Mother Teresa?”

“NO!”

“Susan B. Anthony?  You can be handcuffed and be her when she tried to vote.”

“No.”

“Helen Keller?”

“No.”

“Kathrine Switzer, the first women to register and run in the all male Boston Marathon in 1967?  You can wear a jogging suit with your number half way ripped off like it was on the day she ran when the race director tried to pull it off.

“No.”

“Margaret Thatcher?  You can use your British accent.”

“No.  Tell me some women around today,” she asked.

“Hilary Clinton?”

What was so distressing is watching her dejected face each time I suggested a great woman.  Clearly, no feeling of pride for what women endured and eventually overcame.  Finally, I convinced her that Jackie Kennedy was a grand choice, “She redecorated the White House; she was lovely and glamorous; and she became a book editor after her husband died.”

When I polled her friends on their choices, I was told – Laura Ingalls (young life), Laura Ingalls Wilder (older), Queen Elizabeth, I don’t know, JK Rowling, Snape (male character in Rowling’s Harry Potter series – don’t ask), and Annie Oakley.   That’s the best we’ve got for our girls, two girls sharing Laura Ingalls Wilder?  She’s a great choice, but where are the contemporary role models?

The Washington Post printed an article in February of this year suggesting great movies for girls with positive role models – A League of Their Own (not bad), Miss Congeniality (huh?), Fly Away Home and Whale Rider. Really? That’s the best we have to offer our girls?

Not surprisingly, kids (including mine) watch far too much television.  This article suggests, “One report indicates that for girls ages 12 – 17 years old, 3 out of 4 of their favorite television shows were reality TV shows.”

I think the only clear choice for us moms is to torture our children with one story a week about a woman who did the unthinkable, solved the unsolvable, reached the unreachable and put her stake into the big mountain of I DID IT!

And maybe, just maybe they will understand what it means to really want something so badly that attaining it may just diminish their personal bank of character, will and reputation. Let’s hope that our girls will some day learn that the reward for of one’s hard work is more than money. Daughters of the 21st Century are going to be shocked to find that some things just can’t bought, instead the price is much higher and often much more difficult to spend.

Share

Don’t Miss Tonight’s Show: BlogTalkRadio

Can wearing high heels boost your sex life? Is our government going broke? Frenemies: Sarah Palin vs. Megan McCain – not sure I care about either one of them – you?

Don’t miss the Roundtable tonight at 7pm Eastern – Call in:(347) 857-2102

Share

Don't Miss Tonight's Show: BlogTalkRadio

Can wearing high heels boost your sex life? Is our government going broke? Frenemies: Sarah Palin vs. Megan McCain – not sure I care about either one of them – you?

Don’t miss the Roundtable tonight at 7pm Eastern – Call in:(347) 857-2102

Share

Can Human Rights Abuses Mean Better Jobs for Women?

Is there a correlation between human rights abuses and women succeeding in the workplace?  One would think not, but consider the recent Newsweek article, The Women Who Want to Run the World.   What do we know about China?  It’s ruled by the Communist Party of China, censors radio and television, kills protesters, has an ongoing dispute with the Dalai Lama (perhaps the most peaceful man on the planet) and just a few years ago the Paramilitary police fired on monks and nuns who were marching in support of the Dalai Lama’s return to Tibet.

But…they promote women in the workplace.  In fact, according to the article 31 percent of women in China are executives compared to 20 percent in America.  And,  “half of the 14 female billionaires on Forbes’s 2010 list of the world’s wealthiest people were from mainland China.”

The story cites a study done by the Center for Work-Life Policy that found only 33 percent of college educated American women consider themselves ambitious compared to 66 percent of Chinese women.   In the work place, more than 75 percent of Chinese women are corporate executives compared to just over 50 percent of American women.

How is this possible?  In America, we are free to speak, organize, and even challenge the government.  But, in the U.S. only about 17 percent of Congress is made up of women compared to China’s 21 percent.

How can human rights abuses go on in a country with so many women leaders?  Do I need to rethink my theory on what would happen if women ruled the world?

Sign me
Stunned & Confused

Share